#BRUHNews: Escaped North Carolina Prisoner Found Headless Weeks Later

Kelvin Singleton, an inmate at a North Carolina jail who escaped using a toothbrush shank weapon, was found headless in a field two weeks after break free from prison. Authorities are investigating the mysterious death, along with trying to determine how Singleton managed his daring feat.

As reported by the Roanoke-Chowan News-Herald, Singleton’s body was found April 7 after a hunter crossed its path in Bertie County. The body was found around 15 miles from the Chowan County Detention Center where Singleton was held.

More from the News-Herald:

Singleton broke out of the Chowan County Jail on Easter Sunday afternoon. He was reportedly spotted about ten minutes later a few blocks away in the Edenton town limits, but was reportedly never seen again.

A member of a hunting club discovered what turned out to be Singleton’s nude, partially decomposed and headless body last Thursday near Midway in a wooded area just off Ashland Church Road and reported it to law enforcement. The Bertie County Sheriff’s Office and the State Bureau of Investigation then began a joint investigation into what was believed to be a homicide.

Bertie County Sheriff John Holley said he believed the body had been at the location where it was found for about a week. Holley said Singleton’s head has still not been located.

Chowan County Sheriff Dwayne Goodwin called Singleton’s death one the most bizarre he has seen in his 25 years in law enforcement.

Singleton, 26, used the shank to force a guard to free him from the Center on March 26. He was facing charges of assault with a deadly weapon in Charlotte, where his mother and child lived. In Chowan County, Singleton was arrested at the top of the year for armed robbery.

Police are still searching for the individual or individuals who decapitated Singleton.

Photo: Chowan County Sheriff’s Office

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Source: Hip Hop Wired